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Bobby Heenan

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  • Cannon
    replied
    Originally posted by mizfan View Post
    Heenan's AWA work is some of the best managerial work of all time, but you can't say his work with Andre wasn't part of the prime of his career!
    No doubt he was great in 1987 but I'd compare it to when Ric Flair did something great after 1990. Still past his prime but he could still roll back the years and produce the magic every now and again.

    Maybe it comes down to what you like, if you want wisecracking Heenan more than heat-Heenan you could have very different ideas.

    Leave a comment:


  • mizfan
    replied
    I'd be happy to see a little one next to that Andre statue they made! XD

    Leave a comment:


  • Benjamin Button
    replied
    Bobby was one of a kind . Wit to big for wrestling. Not talked about enough now. WWE should have a statue of him at ringside.

    Leave a comment:


  • mizfan
    replied
    Heenan's AWA work is some of the best managerial work of all time, but you can't say his work with Andre wasn't part of the prime of his career!

    Leave a comment:


  • Cannon
    replied
    Funny thing is Heenan as a manager was already past his prime by the time of the WWF run. And he was still elite.

    I like Heenan and Ventura about the same as commentators so I guess it comes down to what you like.

    Leave a comment:


  • PEN15v2
    replied
    In my chronological WWF viewings, I'm currently in Oct of 1991. Ric Flair just debuted, and Heenan is leading the way. While I could write an essay on how well this debut and push is, the secret is Heenan. He knows how to sell his talents while not hurting his opponents. He knew his role as a manager better than anyone (though Heyman might be tied).

    As for his "broadcast journalist" roles, I find it a mixed bag. In terms of entertainment, his timing and wit is unmatched. Stand up comics should be impressed by him, and there's no denying the reason he's argued as the best color commentary analyst. Where I find he's weak was how he sold the stories pf anyone other than his talent. Not terrible by any means, but Jesse Ventura did such a better job at selling the stories across the board, while having better insight into selling a match.

    This isn't to argue about who was better, because it comes down to what you prefer as a viewer. My point is I feel the only thing he lacked was that single aspect. Everything else, Heenan was unmatched. He makes 1987-1991 Prime Time Wrestling worth watching (and without him, it's often painful).

    There will never be another Heenan.

    Leave a comment:


  • Prime Time
    started a topic Bobby Heenan

    Bobby Heenan

    It's been four years since Bobby Heenan died. I thought it's be a good time and space to share memories of the great man - one of the few people that seems to inspire uniform agreement in this business.

    I sometimes wonder how his reputation would have survived, nowadays, if he'd lived a bit longer. Would people have turned on him for his attitudes towards modern wrestling (which were on record well before he died) or was he so beloved people would have ignored it? I guess we'll never know.

    Anyway, RIP Brain/Weasel. And thanks for the memories.
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